Past Events

  • July 10, 2017 - 9:45am

    Dear colleagues,

    It is my pleasure to announce that Priyamvada Natarajan, Professor of Astronomy and Physics, has agreed to serve as the new director of the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities for a period of three years. Professor Richard Prum, who has served as the inaugural director of the program since 2012, will step down on June 30th having built an innovative and thriving program that bridges schools, academic divisions, and local disciplines within the university.

    Prof. Natarajan is a theoretical astrophysicist who is recognized for her seminal contributions to the study of dark matter and the formation of black holes. One of her key interests is in the mapping of dark matter. In addition to her undergraduate degrees in Physics and Mathematics from MIT and a PhD in Astrophysics from Cambridge, she has done graduate work in the History and Philosophy of Science at the MIT Science and Technology Studies Program. The recipient of many awards and honors for her work including a fellowship at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the Guggenheim and Radcliffe fellowships, she is a fellow of the American Physical Society, and the incoming Chair of the Division of Astrophysics at the APS. She previously served as Chair of the Women Faculty Forum at Yale. As a prominent public intellectual, she is a strong proponent of inter-disciplinarity and is also deeply invested in the dissemination of science. Her research work and writing about science have both been widely published and written about. She is a regular contributor to the New York Review of Books and her first book, Mapping the Heavens: Radical Scientific Ideas that Reveal the Cosmos was published last year by Yale Press.

    The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, housed in the Whitney Humanities Center, was endowed through the generosity of Richard and Barbara Franke in 2012. The Frankes’ vision was to foster substantive intellectual conversation between scholars who shared questions and interests but whose methods came from the distinct traditions of scientific and humanistic inquiry.

    Rick Prum has made that vision a reality during his term as the inaugural director. Under his direction, the program has sponsored a wide variety of events that have made an important contribution to intellectual community at Yale. These ranged from traditional formats–such as lectures by world-renowned scholars and authors and jointly-taught seminars–to plays, gallery exhibitions, and musical performances. Together these significantly enhanced the diversity of intellectual connections across the university. From a discussion of the philosophy of time to a performance of a long forgotten 19th century symphony about the Passenger Pigeon, the program succeeded in bringing diverse audiences together across disciplines.

    As we thank Prof. Prum for the exuberance, imagination, and roving intelligence he brought to the program, we are also grateful for the unflagging support of Gary Tomlinson, Director of the Whitney Humanities Center, and the staff of the Franke Program and the Whitney. Throughout, the program has been spurred on by the ever-curious Rich and Barbara Franke, who have made it all possible.

    We look forward to the fresh leadership that Prof. Natarajan will bring to the Franke Program and to seeing the program grow and thrive in new ways in the coming years.

    Yours,

    Amy Hungerford

    Bird White Housum Professor of English and Professor of American Studies

    Dean of Humanities

  • May 8, 2017 - 5:00pm

    Do the Peacock’s brilliant tail and the lovely song of the Wood Thrush encode information about mate quality? Or are these ornaments merely beautiful?  In The Evolution of Beauty, Director of The Franke Program Richard Prum explores how sexual beauty evolves in the living world through mate choice, including insights into the evolution of human sexuality.

  • May 2, 2017 - 7:00pm

    The Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities Reading Group will meet tonight at 7 p.m. in WHC 208.

    As always, food and refreshments will be served.

    Tonight’s meeting will feature a presentation and discussion from Dr. Chitra Ramalingam, Lecturer in the Department of History and Research Associate at the Yale Center for British Art.  Dr. Ramalingam will deliver a talk titled “The Laboratory as Camera:  Experiment and the Photographic Archive of Victorian Physics.”

  • May 1, 2017 - 4:00pm

    The Slavic Graduate Colloquium Literature, the Arts, and the Environment Colloquium and The Yale Sustainable Food Program present Jane Costlow, Clark A. Griffith Professor of Environmental Studies at Bates College

    Turning the Soil: Cultivating our Gardens in Times of Trouble (Ruminations on Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago)

    At the center of Pasternak’s novel of upheaval and revolution, the poet and his family become gardeners.  Their labors, however, are only an interlude in an otherwise violent and destructive era.  In this talk I want to consider the novel as a narrative of violence and the fragile but essential shelter that is suggested by “the garden.”  Pasternak’s novel echoes, perhaps, the famous conclusion to Voltaire’s Candide, with its enigmatic injunction that in a world of violence, injustice and corruption we must “cultivate our gardens.”  What might all this mean for us, and for people laboring to hold together fertile spaces of continuity and beauty?

    Sponsored by: The Traphagen Alumni Speakers Series, Yale College Office of Student Affairs; The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities; The Yale Sustainable Food Program; The Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund; The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; The Dean’s Fund; and Literature, the Arts, and the Environment Colloquium.
     

  • April 26, 2017 - 5:00pm

    The annual Shulman Lecture Series provides up to four visiting lectures a year to be organized in conjunction with an undergraduate seminar course taught on a topic bridging science and the humanities. 

    The Shulman Lectures are presented under the auspices of the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, which is made possible by the generosity of Richard and Barbara Franke. The series is named after Robert Shulman, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, and senior research scientist in diagnostic radiology, in recognition of his roles as a Founding Fellow of the Whitney and as an unwavering supporter of the integration of science and the humanities.

    The Spring 2017 Shulman Lecture Series “Other Minds” is organized in conjunction with a Yale College seminar taught by Henry Cowles (History) and Laurie Santos (Psychology).

    All lectures will take place at 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Whitney Humanities Center.  They are free and open to the public.  No reservations required.

    http://whc.yale.edu/program/shulman-lectures-science-and-humanities

  • April 21, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:00pm

    https://www.editingnature.org/watch-here

    DNA is the basic building block of life. It is shared by all living things, providing commonality between us and nature. With the advent of CRISPR technology, we now have the capability to alter that very sequence of life, efficiently and
    inexpensively, through a process called gene editing. Using gene editing we could create new solutions for environmental sustainability and public health, but without careful consideration and foresight, gene editing could also irreversibly destroy ecosystems and drastically transform the natural world as we know it.

    Pioneering a new model based on inclusivity and transparency, the Editing Nature Summit will foster dialogue that spans disciplines and viewpoints to honor the complexity of this important issue. Join us for a series of public talks given by thought leaders from ecology, genetics, public policy, ethics, journalism, engineering and architecture that aim to broaden our perspectives and spur conversation.

  • April 20, 2017 - 4:30pm

    https://www.editingnature.org/watch-here

    DNA is the basic building block of life. It is shared by all living things, providing commonality between us and nature. With the advent of CRISPR technology, we now have the capability to alter that very sequence of life, efficiently and
    inexpensively, through a process called gene editing. Using gene editing we could create new solutions for environmental sustainability and public health, but without careful consideration and foresight, gene editing could also irreversibly destroy ecosystems and drastically transform the natural world as we know it.

    Pioneering a new model based on inclusivity and transparency, the Editing Nature Summit will foster dialogue that spans disciplines and viewpoints to honor the complexity of this important issue. Join us for a series of public talks given by thought leaders from ecology, genetics, public policy, ethics, journalism, engineering and architecture that aim to broaden our perspectives and spur conversation.

  • April 17, 2017 - 4:00pm

    Scientific progress can be helped by pluralism, similarly as social progress has been aided by political pluralism.  Contrary to the widespread notion that scientists should maintain a consensus on fundamentals because science is the search for the one truth about the one universe, Dr. Chang will argue that the ideal of science should be to learn about nature in all the various ways in which we can.  Since it is practically impossible to pursue too many avenues of inquiry at once, we need to cultivate a small number of well-chosen systems of practice within each field of study;  this advice is clearly contrary to sanctioning a demand to devote undue attention to highly implausible alternatives (e.g., creationism, climate-change denial).  There are two kinds of benefits to this pluralist approach.  The benefits of toleration arise from each system of practice developing in its own way and delivering its distinctive results.  The benefits of interaction arise from productive engagement between different systems.  Our guest will also point out that science has in fact progressed in a much more pluralist fashion than commonly imagined.  Particularly significant in that regard is what he calls “conservationist pluralism:”  when a successful system of practice has been established, it can and should be kept for what it continues to do well, even after another system that does other things better comes along.  A prime example is the fact that we still teach every student of physics Newtonian mechanics, a topic that remains very cogent in many areas (e.g., “rocket science”) in which more advanced theories such as quantum mechanics or general relativity cannot in fact be used.

    Please note: This event may be [recorded/livestreamed/photographed] for educational, archival or promotional purposes including use in print, on the Internet and in other forms of media. All attendees and participants (or parents/guardians of minors attending the event) agree to the possibility of your voice or likeness captured by these means and used for such purposes, without compensation to you, by virtue of your attending the event or otherwise participating in the event, and hereby waive any related right of privacy or publicity.

  • April 11, 2017 - 7:00pm

    The next meeting of the reading group Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities will take place Tuesday, April 11, at 7pm, Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall Street), Room 208.  As always, food and refreshments will be served.

    The meeting will feature a presentation and discussion from Dr. Claire Bowern, Associate Professor in Yale Linguistics Department.  Dr. Bowern will speak about her paper, “Phylogenetic approach to the evolution of color term systems.” This paper is already uploaded to the Google Drive.  If there are any questions or concerns before our next meeting, please contact ethan.perets@yale.edu.

  • April 10, 2017 - 4:00pm

    The visionary German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt (1769 -1859) was daringly adventurous but also created the way we understand nature today.  He was the most famous scientist of his age and even predicted human-induced climate change.  In her award–winning and bestselling book, Andrea Wulf traces his ideas as they go on to revolutionize and shape science, conservation, nature writing, politics, art, and the theory of evolution.

    For a short film about The Invention of Nature, please see here:

  • April 10, 2017 - 4:00pm

    The Slavic Graduate Colloquium and The Yale Sustainable Food Program present Darra Goldstein, Willcox B. and Harriet M. Adsit Professor of Russian at Williams College and Founding Editor of Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture

    This talk explores Russian national identity and cuisine from the 18th century into the present.  Ever since Peter the Great opened his country to the West, the Russians have struggled with ambivalence toward outside influences.  This unease has extended beyond political wariness into cuisine, with Western foodways alternately embraced and rejected over the years.  Today, following Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, Western food is again politically fraught.  The economic sanctions imposed by Europe, Australia, and the U.S. have led Russia to ban imports of meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, and dairy products, causing widespread food shortages.  Russians are famously accustomed to deprivation, but these latest shortages have led not to resignation but to a gradual revival of artisanal production that is transforming Russia’s gastronomic landscape.  We can see a new form of nationalism being played out in the culinary sphere.

    Sponsored by The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities;  The Yale Sustainable Food Program;  The Edward J. and Dorothy Clarke Kempf Memorial Fund;  The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures;  The Dean’s Fund;  and The Slavic Graduate Colloquium.
     

  • April 5, 2017 - 5:00pm

    The annual Shulman Lecture Series provides up to four visiting lectures a year to be organized in conjunction with an undergraduate seminar course taught on a topic bridging science and the humanities. 

    The Shulman Lectures are presented under the auspices of the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, which is made possible by the generosity of Richard and Barbara Franke. The series is named after Robert Shulman, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, and senior research scientist in diagnostic radiology, in recognition of his roles as a Founding Fellow of the Whitney and as an unwavering supporter of the integration of science and the humanities.

    The Spring 2017 Shulman Lecture Series “Other Minds” is organized in conjunction with a Yale College seminar taught by Henry Cowles (History) and Laurie Santos (Psychology).

    All lectures will take place at 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Whitney Humanities Center.  They are free and open to the public.  No reservations required.

    http://whc.yale.edu/program/shulman-lectures-science-and-humanities

  • April 4, 2017 - 3:00pm

    How do we visualize the complex and intangible forces which surround us? It turns out to be surprisingly difficult without employing a range of similes, resemblances, and metaphors.  Unlike science, art offers ways of looking at problems that are wobbly and uncertain, neatly sidestepping the need for rigorous quantification or stabilization. Ordinary things can stand in for the rare, the speculative or the impossible to glimpse, events can be collapsed and condensed into layered images. Our guest offers a brief overview of my practice to date, outlining the ways in which the history of science, human knowledge and our changing understanding of the universe unfold in my work through the mediums of paper, ink, and the odd bit of yarn.

  • March 31, 2017 - 3:00pm
  • March 30, 2017 - 6:30pm
  • March 3, 2017 - 9:00am to 12:00pm

    Mapping for Social Justices:  Approaches with New Media and the Digital Humanities

  • February 24, 2017 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Professor Samuel K. Roberts, Jr. of Columbia University will deliver this talk as the keynote address of the conference “Critical Histories and Activist Futures:  Science, Medicine and Racial Violence.”

  • February 23, 2017 - 5:00pm
  • February 22, 2017 - 5:00pm

    The annual Shulman Lecture Series provides up to four visiting lectures a year to be organized in conjunction with an undergraduate seminar course taught on a topic bridging science and the humanities. 

    The Shulman Lectures are presented under the auspices of the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, which is made possible by the generosity of Richard and Barbara Franke. The series is named after Robert Shulman, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, and senior research scientist in diagnostic radiology, in recognition of his roles as a Founding Fellow of the Whitney and as an unwavering supporter of the integration of science and the humanities.

    The Spring 2017 Shulman Lecture Series “Other Minds” is organized in conjunction with a Yale College seminar taught by Henry Cowles (History) and Laurie Santos (Psychology).

    All lectures will take place at 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Whitney Humanities Center.  They are free and open to the public.  No reservations required.

    http://whc.yale.edu/program/shulman-lectures-science-and-humanities

  • February 15, 2017 - 5:00pm

    The annual Shulman Lecture Series provides up to four visiting lectures a year to be organized in conjunction with an undergraduate seminar course taught on a topic bridging science and the humanities. 

    The Shulman Lectures are presented under the auspices of the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, which is made possible by the generosity of Richard and Barbara Franke. The series is named after Robert Shulman, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, and senior research scientist in diagnostic radiology, in recognition of his roles as a Founding Fellow of the Whitney and as an unwavering supporter of the integration of science and the humanities.

    The Spring 2017 Shulman Lecture Series “Other Minds” is organized in conjunction with a Yale College seminar taught by Henry Cowles (History) and Laurie Santos (Psychology).

    All lectures will take place at 5 p.m. in the auditorium of the Whitney Humanities Center.  They are free and open to the public.  No reservations required.

    http://whc.yale.edu/program/shulman-lectures-science-and-humanities

  • February 14, 2017 - 7:00pm

    The first meeting of the spring semester will take place Tuesday, February 14, at 7 p.m. at the Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall Street), Room 208.  Refreshments and pizza will be served.

    At this meeting, the group will discuss a chapter from Timon Screech’s 2002 publication The Lens Within the Heart: the Western Scientific Gaze and Popular Imagery in Later Edo Japan, focusing in particular on the author’s discussion of the scientific microscope in eighteenth-century Japan (pages 194-211). The text is now accessible through the Google Drive (if you do not have access, please let Ethan Perets know).

    Upcoming meetings:

    March 14, 7 p.m., talk from Dr. Caroline Fowler, Postdoctoral Associate in the History of Art

    April 11, 7 p.m., discussion TBA

    May 2, 7 p.m., talk from Dr. Chitra Ramalingam, Lecturer in History of Science

     

  • February 13, 2017 - 4:00pm

    Drawing on her life as an indigenous plant scientist, a teacher, a writer and a mother, Professor Kimmerer will lecture on topics found in her award-winning book Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, in which she shows how plants—asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash and sweetgrass—offer us gifts and lessons, even if we’ve forgotten how to hear their voices.  In traditional ecological knowledge, plants are regarded not only as persons, but as among our oldest teachers.  If plants are our teachers, what are they teaching us and how can we be better students?  In a rich braid of ecological science, indigenous philosophy and literary reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she explores and celebrates the material and cultural gifts of plants and our responsibilities for reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world.

    She holds a B.S. in botany from SUNY ESF, an M.S. and Ph.D. in botany from the University of Wisconsin, and is the author of numerous scientific papers on plant ecology, bryophyte ecology, traditional knowledge and restoration ecology.  As a writer and a scientist, her interests in restoration include not only restoration of ecological communities, but restoration of our relationships to land.  She lives on an old farm in upstate New York, tending gardens both cultivated and wild.

  • February 9, 2017 - 4:30pm

    *Note that this event will be held as anticipated, regardless of Thursday’s impending snowstorm.*

    Connections between physics and technological invention and aspects of human life that seem far from science are both unexpected and unexpectedly common.  And rather than flowing one way - from physics to gadgets - the connections form an intricate web, linking all aspects of human culture, in a way that frustrates our convenient compartmentalizations and coarse interventions aimed at promoting technology transfer.  Our distinguished guest will discuss this theme not abstractly but with examples, ranging from music to the color of gold, and explain how quantum physics helps him do quantum physics (sic).

  • January 16, 2017 - 8:00am to March 3, 2017 - 1:00pm

    The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is now accepting applications for our Franke Fellowship in Science and the Humanities.

    These competitive grants, made possible through the generous support of Mr. and Mrs. Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke, are awarded to rising Yale College seniors to support senior essay, research, or art project proposals that explore new and productive intellectual connections between science and the humanities.  Fellowships are intended to fund research during the summer between junior and senior year, or during the following academic year.

    Successful applicants will receive up to $2,000 and will be expected to produce a presentation of their work.  Fellows will also participate in two dinners with their advisors and the donors of the Program.

    Please search the student grants database for “Franke” to learn more.  We shall be hosting an information session for the fellowship sometime in February;  details to follow.
     

  • January 14, 2017 - 10:00am to March 3, 2017 - 1:00pm

    The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is now accepting applications for our Franke Fellowship in Science and the Humanities.

    These competitive grants, made possible through the generous support of Mr. and Mrs. Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke, are awarded to rising Yale College seniors to support senior essay, research, or art project proposals that explore new and productive intellectual connections between science and the humanities.  Fellowships are intended to fund research during the summer between junior and senior year, or during the following academic year.

    Successful applicants will receive up to $2,000 and will be expected to produce a presentation of their work.  Fellows will also participate in two dinners with their advisors and the donors of the Program.  Refer to the attached documents for help in preparing requested materials.

    Please search the student grants database for “Franke” to learn more.  We shall be hosting an information session for the fellowship sometime in February;  details to follow.

  • December 7, 2016 - 7:00pm

    We are pleased to announce that the third meeting of the reading group Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities will take place Wednesday, December 7, at 7 p.m. at the Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall Street), Room 208.

    For the next meeting, the group will discuss the text “Fertilization Narratives in the Art of Gustav Klimt, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo: Repression, Domination, and Eros among Cells.”  One of the group members has kindly uploaded a copy of the text to the Google Drive folder (if you don’t have access to the Google Drive account, please contact ethan.perets@yale.edu.

  • November 30, 2016 - 4:00pm

    The history of the restoration of native species is inextricable from the history of nativism, but in ways that are not immediately apparent. To see how nativism shaped ecological restoration in the United States, it is necessary to consider not only why people came to care about native species, but how they proposed to protect them. During the interwar years wildflower preservation societies attempted to exert control over “new immigrants,” while wildlife preservation societies established the nation’s first wildlife reservations on Indian reservations that the federal government was systematically dismantling in order to erode tribal sovereignty. Today, these societies’ successors, The Nature Conservancy and National Wildlife Refuge System, manage 119 million acres and 150 million acres respectively, and we should consider to what extent contemporary ecological intervention remains implicated by this history of disempowerment and dispossession.

    Bio:  Laura J. Martin is a Ziff Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment and the Department of the History of Science. In 2015 she received her Ph.D. from Cornell University, specializing in evolutionary ecology and environmental history. She has been awarded national fellowships in history and in ecology. Her research explores how humans intentionally and unintentionally shape the distribution and diversity of other species. Her current project, “Saving Species: Ecological Restoration from the Dust Bowl to De-extinction,” examines the history of ecological restoration as an idea, practice, and scientific discipline.

    http://environment.harvard.edu/about/fellows/laura-j-martin

  • November 2, 2016 - 7:00pm

    Second Meeting of Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities:  An Interdisciplinary Reading Group for Graduate Students
    November 2, 7 p.m.
    Whitney Humanities Center, Room 208
    53 Wall Street

    The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is pleased to announce that the second meeting of this new graduate student reading group will take place on Wednesday, November 2 from 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. in room 208 of the Whitney Humanities Center.  Sponsored by our program, the group is dedicated to discussion of interdisciplinary research topics at the interface of art and the natural sciences.

    This meeting will feature a presentation from Dr. Keely Orgeman, Alice and Allan Kaplan Assistant Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery.  Dr. Orgeman will lead a discussion on American artist Thomas Wilfred, a leading figure in optics and light projections in the 20th century, whose work will be the subject of an exhibition opening at the Yale University Art Gallery in February 2017.  Dr. Orgeman will discuss opportunities for reading group members to be involved with a project related to the show that bridges interests in STEM and the humanities.

    Whether you want to explore a career between the arts and sciences, have an interest in pursuing collaborative research projects, or just want to find out more about the latest arts research using scientific approaches, all interested graduate students are encouraged to attend.  The meetings will also be an opportunity to meet and interact with fellow graduate students in departments outside your own, and with overlapping interests in interdisciplinary research.  Pizza and refreshments will be served at this and subsequent meetings.

    For more details on the Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities graduate student reading group, please visit the reading group’s webpage.

    Likewise, if you are interested in receiving emails from the group, you may sign up for the mailing list here.
     

  • October 25, 2016 - 4:00pm

    If labs and museums have a common origin in the rationality of European Enlightement, I argue that they have been redefined after the Second World War with a contradictory injunction : their collections have to circulate globally, because they concern the public at large, but they have to be secured, because their value increases on the market. The classical need to store collections has been transformed into an injunction to stockpile goods for a coming catastrophe, with different relations to the future. I will illustrate this claim through cases from my research with Influenza experts in Hong Kong and with curators at the musée du quai Branly in Paris. Borrowing the notion of preparedness from the debates in global health, I will show that it sheds light in contemporary debates on the virtual museum and restitution.

    Frédéric Keck is a researcher at the Laboratory of Social Anthropology and Director of the Research Department of the Quai Branly Museum . After studying philosophy at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris and anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley , he has been researching the history of anthropology and contemporary biopolitical questions. He published Claude Lévi-Strauss, une introduction (Pocket-La découverte, 2005), Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, entre philosophie et anthropologie (CNRS Editions, 2008) Un monde grippé ( Flammarion, 2010). He has co-edited (with N . Vialles ) Des hommes malades des animaux, L’ Herne, 2012 and (with A. Lakoff) Sentinel devices„ Limn, 2013.

  • October 14, 2016 - 10:30am

    That Way Madness Lies…

    7 p.m. on Monday, October 17, 2016
    Loria Center 250, 190 York Street

    The Franke Program in Science and Humanities is pleased to bring to your attention a documentary screening on campus sponsored by Mind Matters at Yale.  This remarkable film covers the story of a man’s descent into paranoid schizophrenia and the challenges that it poses for both his family and for his ability to function as a member of society at large.

  • October 5, 2016 - 7:00pm

    Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities:  An Interdisciplinary Reading Group for Graduate Students is having its first meeting of the 2016-2017 academic year.

    The inaugural meeting of the graduate student reading group in Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities will take place Wednesday, October 5, from 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. in the Whitney Humanities Center.  Sponsored by The Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, the reading group will be dedicated to discussion of interdisciplinary research topics at the interface of art and the natural sciences.  Whether you want to explore a career between the arts and sciences, have an interest in pursuing collaborative research projects, or just want to find out more about the latest arts research using scientific approaches, all interested graduate students are encouraged to attend.  The meetings will also be an opportunity to meet and interact with fellow graduate students in departments outside your own, and with overlapping interests in interdisciplinary research.

    For more details, please visit our description of the program here.  Pizza and refreshments will be served.

    If you are interested in receiving emails from the Cultural Heritage in Science and the Humanities graduate student reading group, please sign up for our mailing list at http://mailman.yale.edu/mailman/listinfo/scihumreadinggroup.
     

  • October 4, 2016 - 5:00pm

    Lecture by:
    Prof. Mihaela Pavlicev
    Department of Theoretical Biology
    University of Vienna

    and

    Prof. Gunter P. Wagner
    Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and
    Systems Biology Institute
    Yale University

    With Commentary by:

    Prof. Elisabeth Lloyd
    Department of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
    Indiana University
     

    The origin and meaning of female orgasm has occupied biologists and philosophers since the beginning of the study of life. The main problem is that female orgasm has no manifest roles in human reproduction but is never the less a complex physiological trait. We propose that female orgasm is derived from a neuro-endocrine reflex that was necessary for ovulation but in primates lost its reproductive role. We will also discuss the implications of our model for the understanding of so-called “orgasmic dysfunction.”

     

  • September 14, 2016 - 5:45pm

    The Franke Program is pleased to announce the formation of a new reading group dedicated to exploring the subject of cultural heritage in science and humanities.  Dates for group meetings will be posted here, but in the meantime, you may learn more about this group here.

  • September 12, 2016 - 6:00pm

    The Franke Program is pleased to welcome this year’s cohort of Franke Undergraduate Fellows.  More details about their exciting projects will soon be published on this website.

  • May 12, 2016 - 3:00pm

    Maria Batlle is a social entrepreneur, film maker, sculptor, and painter from the Dominican Republic.  In 2013, she created The Muse Seek Project to make a significant impact in the education system for the deaf through music.  Every year, Ms. Batlle explores the benefits of music in education together with Yo Yo Ma, The Silk Road Ensemble, teaching artists, and educators from all over the world at Harvard University.

    She directed an original documentary film about her latest initiative,“Whale Muse Seek,” which opened up the world of live whale music to deaf children, an endeavor without precedent.  It was described as a “brilliant initiative for deaf children” by Forbes magazine, as a “revolution in education” by the Dominican Minister of Culture, and presented as a “successful case of accessible tourism in the Dominican Republic” by the Dominican Ministry of Tourism.

    In October 2015, the newspapers El Diario de NY and La Opinión de Los Angeles, acclaimed her work in this way:  “A hurricane called Maria is revolutionizing education for the deaf in the D.R. and soon the world.”

  • May 4, 2016 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm

    The Franke Program in Science in the Humanities is proud to celebrate the publication of two new books on maps and mapping by Yale faculty members on Wednesday, May 4th from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in Room 108 of the Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street. No responses are necessary;  just come and enjoy the event.

      Priyamvada Natarajan is Professor of Astronomy & Physics at Yale and former Chair of the Yale Women’s Faculty Forum.  Her research focuses on cosmology, gravitational lensing, and the formation and growth history of black holes over cosmic time.  In Mapping the Heavens, published this week by Yale University Press, Natarajan traces the dynamic intellectual history of our conception of the universe.  She explores the role of maps and mapping in the many revolutionary and radical scientific transformations of our view of the cosmos and our place within it.  She uses maps literally and metaphorically to trace our ever-evolving understanding of the universe.

     William Rankin is Assistant Professor of History of Science and Medicine in the History Department at Yale University.  Rankin’s research focuses on the relationship between science and space, from the planetary scale down to the scale of individual buildings.  His forthcoming book, After the Map: Cartography, Navigation, and the Transformation of Territory in the Twentieth Century, will be published by the University of Chicago Press in June, 2016.  The book is a history of the mapping sciences in the twentieth century that traces the shift from the god’s-eye view of the paper map to the embedded experience of GPS.

  • April 25, 2016 - 3:30pm

    Can we contain some of the deadliest, most long-lasting substances ever produced?  Left over from the Cold War are a hundred million gallons of radioactive sludge, covering vast radioactive lands.  Governments around the world, desperate to protect future generations, have begun imagining society 10,000 years from now in order to create monuments that will speak across the time.  Part observational essay filmed in weapons plants, Fukushima and deep underground—and part graphic novel—Containment weaves between an uneasy present and an imaginative, troubled far future, exploring the idea that over millennia, nothing stays put.

    Film screening will be followed by a discussion with the directors of this documentary.  For more information about this remarkable film, please visit the official site.

  • April 14, 2016 - 4:00pm

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti resulted in a tremendous loss of life, and had a devastating impact on the nation’s infrastructure, including its cultural heritage. The Smithsonian led an unprecedented collaborative effort with Haitian, American and international organizations to establish an emergency cultural recovery center, saving some 35,000 paintings, sculptures, murals, and artifacts, and training some 150 Haitians in collection management and conservation. Following this, the Smithsonian led projects in Mali, Egypt, Nepal, Iraq and Syria to save heritage endangered by natural disaster and human conflict. Kurin describes these projects—of contemporary “monuments men and women” in light of varied and sometimes competing governmental, professional and private priorities, interests and objectives, and highlights research, legislative and operational needs to address threatened heritage. The lecture coincides with Smithsonian participation in the Global Colloquium of University Presidents in New Haven and follows his participation with Yale President Peter Salovey in sessions about saving cultural heritage at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

  • April 11, 2016 - 5:00pm

    Monday, April 11th (Rescheduled Time):  Liz Lerman, Choreographer, Performer, Writer, and Educator:  “Creative Research:  Crossing Borders, Disciplines, and Domains”

  • April 11, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

    This panel discussion, featuring Drs. Matthew Ellman, William Sledge, and Lisa Sanders, will review the challenges and opportunities for improving the human experience of medical care.  Conversation with our specialists will aim to address different life stages and ways of interaction with the medical system.

  • March 16, 2016 - 4:00pm to April 1, 2016 - 1:00pm

    We are pleased to announce that the competition for The Franke Fellowship in Science and the Humanities is now open!  Made possible through the generous support of Mr. and Mrs. Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke, these fellowships of up to $2,000 are awarded to rising seniors to support senior essay research or art project proposals that explore new and productive intellectual connections between science and the humanities.  Please search the student grants database for “Franke” to learn more.

  • March 10, 2016 - 5:00pm

    Young-Kee Kim of the University of Chicago will present “An Atom as an Onion”

  • March 10, 2016 - 3:30pm

    KINGS PARK: Stories from an American Mental Institution captures the rapidly vanishing history of our public mental health care system and the legacy of deinstitutionalization, asking “how do our past decisions concerning the treatment of people with mental health conditions influence and shape policy and practice today and into the future?”

    On June 21, 1967, at the age of 17, award-winning filmmaker Lucy Winer was committed to the female violent ward of Kings Park State Hospital following a series of failed suicide attempts. Over 30 years later, Lucy returns to Kings Park for the first time since her discharge. Her journey back sparks a decade-long effort to face her past and learn the story of the now abandoned institution that once held her captive. Her meetings with other former “patients,” their families, and the hospital staff, reveal the painful legacy of our state hospital system and the crisis left by its demise.

  • March 8, 2016 - 6:00pm

    We are pleased to announce that The Franke Fellowship in Science and the Humanities is now open!

    Tonight at 6 p.m., we shall host an information session about the grants in Room B04 of the Whitney Humanities Center.  Come and learn about our program and how to apply for our grant.

    Made possible through the generous support of Mr. and Mrs. Richard (‘53) and Barbara Franke, the fellowships are awarded to rising seniors to support senior essay research or art project proposals that explore new and productive intellectual connections between science and the humanities.  Please search the student grants database for “Franke” to learn more.

  • February 28, 2016 - 3:00pm to April 17, 2016 - 6:00pm

  • June 8, 2015 - 2:00pm

    Site Projects Inc, the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, Yale Physics Dept and Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects present:

  • April 21, 2015 - 4:00pm

    David Albert, Frederick E. Woodbridge Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University (left) and Tim Maudlin, Professor of Philosophy at NYU (right) will present recent work and engage in a conversation regarding the possibility of mechanical explanations of the direction of time. 

  • April 18, 2015 - 7:00pm

    The Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics with support from the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities present a rock opera by Corky Laing and the Perfect Child: “Playing God.”

    This event is free and open to the public. 

  • February 25, 2015 - 5:00pm

    On Wednesday, 25 February, Randolph Distinguished Professor of Hispanic Studies at Vassar College Lisa Paravisini-Gebert will visit Yale to present from her new project “Extinctions: Vanishing Fauna and the Caribbean’s Environmental Imagination.” 

    This event is generously co-sponsored by the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities, the Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies, the Program in Environmental Studies and the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies’ Student Interest Group in Latin America.

  • February 12, 2015 - 4:15pm

    Graphing the Brain’s Dark Energy: Network Models and Neural Mechanisms

    A lecture by Carl Craver, Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. 

    Abstract: In a recent paper on network analysis, Philipe Hunneman conjectures that topological explanations represent a style of explanation distinct from mechanistic explanation. I discuss these claims in the context of recent work using resting state functional correlations to infer cortical structure. Graph theory and network analysis are central research tools in the Human Connectome Project (Sporns 2011). I argue (in agreement with Hunneman) that that network models (often coupled with facts about localization) can be used to describe features of the organization of complex mechanisms that other representational systems are ill-equipped to describe. I catalogue some of the most promising uses of network theory in contemporary connectomics. I argue, however, that network theory can be used to construct accurate, complete, and well-verified mathematical descriptions of both brain activity and brain structure that explain nothing at all. The explanatory force of the model comes not from the fact that it is a network model but from the fact that network analysis reveals something useful about the organization of a mechanism. Network models that fail in this regard would not be explanatorily interesting. Philosophical emphasis on the explanatory value of network models distracts attention from more interesting questions raised by network theory concerning the organization of complex systems and the methods by which that organization might efficiently be discovered. 

     
     
  • February 11, 2015 - 5:00pm

    Episodic Memory, Time, and Agency: Some Constraints from Neuropsychology

    A lecture by Carl Craver, Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. 

    Abstract: People with episodic amnesia are frequently said to be stuck in time, trapped in a permanent present tense, and altogether lacking a subjective sense of temporality. These claims are grounded in the well-characterized inability of persons with episodic amnesia to perform much above floor on standard questionnaire tests assaying their ability to remember past personal episodes and to imagine vividly what one might do in the future. I review recent empirical work demonstrating several distinct varieties of temporal knowledge and sensitivity in people with acquired or developmental cases of episodic amnesia. These studies raise doubts about whether the sense of time, mental time travel, and (indeed) episodic memory constitute well-formed psychological kinds. At very least, they caution against a pernicious kind of semantic creep common in (psychological) science. 

  • November 11, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Elizabeth Kolbert is a staff writer for The New Yorker and has written widely on the science of our environmental crises. She is the author of Field Notes from a Catastrophe (2006). Her Franke Program lecture will be based on her latest book, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History, published this year.

    This is event is co-sponsored by the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism at Yale.

  • November 5, 2014 - 5:00pm

    Richard Preston has written nine books, including The Hot ZoneThe Demon in the Freezer, and The Wild Trees.  His books have been translated into more than 30 languages, and most of them have first appeared as articles in The New Yorker.  Preston has won numerous awards, including the American Institute of Physics Award and the National Magazine Award. He’s also the only person not a medical doctor ever to receive the Centers for Disease Control’s Champion of Prevention Award for public health. An asteroid is named “Preston” after him. (Asteroid Preston is a ball of rock three miles in diameter, traveling on a wild orbit near Mars.)

    http://richardpreston.net/about-richard-preston

  • November 3, 2014 - 5:00pm

    Reorganizing Ourselves

    A conversation with Deborah Hay, Alva Noë and Michèle Steinwald
    .
    A conversation on perception and consciousness in three parts that combines Deborah Hay’s performative lecture “A Continuity of Discontinuity,” Alva Noë’s “See me if you can!” and concludes with a participatory salon-style discussion with Hay, Noë and audience members, facilitated by Michèle Steinwald.

    This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Perceptions Unfold: Looking at Deborah Hay’s Dance. This conversation is made possible in part by the Doris Duke Performing Artist Awards program, and the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities.  Additional sponsorship for the Yale presentation of this exhibition and for the accompanying seminar has been provided by an anonymous donor.

    For more information on Deborah Hay’s work and her current installation at the Yale School of Art, Perception Unfolds: Looking at Deborah Hay’s Dance, visit her website at http://www.deborahhay.com/

    Monday, November 3, 2014
    5.00 - 8.00 pm

    Yale School of Art
    36 Edgewood Avenue
    Room 204

    For more information: (203) 432 2600
    Open to the public and free of charge

  • October 11, 2014 - 10:30am

    SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11TH

    Extinction: Biology, Culture, and Our Futures
    a daylong symposium
    10:30 AM, Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium

    and
    The Columbiad, or Migration of American Wild Passenger Pigeons
    by Anthony Philip Heinrich, North American Premiere, performed by the Yale Symphony Orchestra
    7:30 PM, Woolsey Hall

    Symposium Speakers Include:

    Resit Akçakaya, Professor of Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University
    Neely Bruce, Professor of Music and American Studies, Wesleyan University
    David Harrison, Professor of Linguistics, Swarthmore College
    Ursula Heise, Professor of English, UCLA
    Ben Novak, Lead Researcher of “The Great Passenger Pigeon Comeback,” The Long Now Foundation
    Lukas Rieppel, Assistant Professor of History, Brown
    David Sepkoski, Research Scholar, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

    Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the extinction of American Passenger Pigeons, the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities is pleased to announce two events on Saturday, October 11.  Extinction: Biology, Culture, and Our Futures is a symposium on the scientific, cultural, and humanistic implications of human mediated extinction. The event brings together biologists, historians of science, linguists, and literary scholars for lectures and discussions on extinction. The symposium will report on the contemporary extinction crisis, and reflect on the broader implications of extinction for the planet’s biota, human cultures, and our understanding of ourselves.

    Following the symposium, we are pleased to sponsor the North American premiere of The Columbiad, or Migration of American Wild Passenger Pigeons performed by the Yale Symphony Orchestra. This symphony was composed by Anthony Philip Heinrich in 1857 and was inspired by the spectacular migration of the wild Passenger Pigeons in the United States before their demise. Heinrich immigrated  to the United in the early 19th century and ultimately settled in Kentucky where he became acquainted  with John James Audubon and the American wilderness. Heinrich was a classically trained musician, and became the first symphonic composer in America. He composed a number of grand programmatic works for symphony about the American landscape. The Columbiad was composed in 1857, and was performed only once in Prague to great acclaim in the same year. The YSO performance will be both the New World Premiere and the first performance in over 150 years.
     

    Full Schedule of Events
     

    10:30                          Coffee and Tea, Room 108, Whitney Humanities Center (WHC), 53 Wall Street

    10:45                           Welcome to Yale and Introducing the Conference, Auditorium, WHC, 53 Wall Street
                                                          Richard Prum, Director of the Franke Program and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    11:00                           David Sepkoski, Catastrophic Thinking: Extinction & the Value of Diversity
                                        Lukas Rieppel, Bringing Dinosaurs Back to Life at the American
                                                                         Museum of Natural History   

                                                            Moderator: Henry Cowles, Assistant Professor, History of Medicine, Yale

    12:15                             Lunch 

    1:30                              Resit Akçakaya, Predicting and Preventing Extinctions in an Era of Climate Change
                                         Ben Novak, How To Bring Passenger Pigeons All the Way Back
                                                             ModeratorWalter Jetz, Associate Professor, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Yale

    2:45                               Coffee & Tea, Room 108 WHC

    3:00                               David Harrison, Extinction and Survival of Languages
                                          Ursula Heise, How We Learned To Start Worrying and Love Extinction Stories
                                                             Moderator: Karen Hébert, Assistant Professor
                                                                             Anthropology and School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale

    4:15                              Neely Bruce, Introducing Heinrich’s The Columbiad, with piano

    5:00                              Richard Prum, Concluding Remarks                              

    7:30                              The Yale Symphony Orchestra Performs The Columbiad, Woolsey Hall
                                                   The concert is free and unticketed.

  • September 9, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Join us for the first meeting of the new reading group, Reading Science: Portrayals of Science and Medicine in Popular Fiction and Nonfiction on September 9 from 4:00-6:30 PM in Room 116 at the Whitney Humanities Center. 

    The first meeting of this group will feature a discussion of Michael Crichton’s novel Timeline. Invited guest and discussant is Professor Joanna Radin, History of Science and Medicine, at Yale.

    For more information, contact the organizer, Charlotte Abney at charlotte.abney@yale.edu

    This reading group is sponsored in part by the Franke Program in Science and the Humanities.

     

  • May 1, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Jenny Reardon is an Associate Professor of Sociology and Faculty Affiliate in the Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

    Talk abstract: While assembling the 3 billion nucleotide sequence of the human genome into machine-readable form might have been a tremendous technical feat, it left unanswered the fundamental question: what does the sequence mean?  In the decade after the Human Genome Project, this turn to the question of meaning—the question of the uses, significance and values of the human genome sequence—marks what I call the postgenomic condition.  This talk explores how in the wake of few biomedical breakthroughs, human genomics continued to generate hope through promises to generate a more just world.  It focuses on the emergence of this strategy in efforts to recruit African Americans into human genomic research at the turn of the millennium. Based in fieldwork at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and historically black universities and colleges, this talk explores the opportunities, but also the problems for ethics, justice, and knowledge these efforts posed.  It ends with reflections on what this turn to justice in human genomics reveals about the contemporary conditions of knowledge and politics.

  • April 21, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Familiar summaries of evolution by natural selection hold that one requirement for evolutionary change of this kind is heredity. Parents must resemble their offspring; like must beget like. In many organisms, however, that is not how things seem to work. Many life cycles feature long and complex chains in which like begets unlike, before they return to their starting point. These phenomena show how strongly our familiar descriptions of evolution have been guided by a vertebrate-centric view of life. After describing the problem I’ll offer a solution, in which the familiar notion of reproduction is generalized. Simple and familiar forms of reproduction are one among many modes of cyclical production, a mode distinguished by a particular placement of features including the sexual fusion of lineages, multiplication, and “bottlenecks” or narrowings of structure. Genetic “replication,” rather than being treated as fundamental, should be handled within the same framework.

  • April 1, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Like other foundational concept in biology, as for instance genes and species etc., homology has a long history of frustrating the efforts of biologists and philosophers to define it. On its most general level, homology means correspondence of body parts across species, i.e. the continuity of character identity over evolutionary time. The difficulties arise, in part, from the fact that characters that are manifest the same in various animals can develop from different genes and along different developmental pathways. This fact is leading to the question whether it is at all meaningful to speak of the same character in different animals/species. In this talk I will defend my recent proposal, that character identity can be linked to our mechanistic understanding of development. The basis for my thesis is the realization that character identity and character states are caused by different developmental genetic mechanisms. My hypothesis states that character identity is tied to developmental mechanisms that enable differential expression of “realizer” genes. These character identity gene networks do not dictate whether a body part is in fact different from other parts or in what way it is different from the rest of the body. Homology is not only conceptually abstract, but also mechanistically abstract, in the sense that it stands for the potential to be different rather than for a particular way to be different. This conception of character identity, if validated, has consequences for the metaphysics of evolutionary biology that will be discussed in this talk as well. 

  • March 3, 2014 - 3:30pm
     
     
     
    Monday March 3, 2014
    3:30 pm Tea, 3rd floor, Sloane Physics Lab
    4:00 pm Lecture, Sloane Physics Lab #57, 217 Prospect St
     
    Physics and dance both engage with bodies in motion within the
    context of time, energy, and space. We will share some of the
    underlying theory and outcomes of our interdisciplinary collaboration,
    which includes the course that we co-teach at Yale, The
    Physics of Dance, and a coursebook that we are developing. We
    will conclude our presentation with a screening of the
    science-art video we created with the support of the Arts
    Council of Greater New Haven titled “Three Views of the Higgs
    and Dance.”
     
    We are pleased to co-sponsor this event with thee Department of Physics, Dance Studies/Theater
    Studies.
  • February 24, 2014 - 4:00pm

    In the 1984 preface to Cells into Organs: The Forces that Shape the Embryo, Yale embryologist John Trinkaus (‘Trink’) argued that, “‘molecular’ does not necessarily mean ‘analytical’ nor, by contrast, does ‘cellular’ or ‘histological’ necessarily imply ‘descriptive.’” Trink was reacting to the rising dominance of molecular genetic methods in the study of development, aptly encapsulated by his former PhD student, Albert Harris: “To the molecular types, a cause is a molecule or a gene. To explain a phenomenon is to identify genes and characterize proteins… A molecule is an explanation: a force is a description; to argue otherwise brings pity, at best.” Although a genetic explanatory paradigm is predominant in biology for good empirical reasons, increasing attention has been paid to how physical processes can explain development. This involves an appeal to generic features that are not unique to biological entities (e.g., shear forces due to fluid flow). Finding ways to integrate or combine generic and genetic explanatory strategies is difficult because apportioning causal responsibility among different types of causes requires a common currency. John Stuart Mill recognized this long ago in his discussion of the composition of causes and “the intermixture of effects,” but his solution relied on ascertaining the effect of each cause in isolation. After reviewing extant philosophical models for integration, I use two ideas—temporal sequence juxtaposition and actual difference making—to formulate a new approach that exploits an idealization in Mill’s methods: the mediating process between cause and effect is treated as irrelevant. My analysis helps to illuminate the resurgence of generic approaches and accounts for why this kind of integration may not always be palatable to developmental biologists because it can narrow the scope of generalizations secured for each mode of causation separately. Additionally, my analysis illustrates the value of philosophy for collaboratively achieving explanatory goals in ongoing empirical inquiry.

  • February 5, 2014 - 4:00pm

    Most of us, at one or more points in our lives, undergo a personal crisis that makes us question our previous coping efforts and values.  Some people succeed in working through such a crisis and making selective changes in themselves, while other people don’t succeed.  Nations also face national crises, which may or may not be successfully solved by selective changes.  Are the factors that predict successful resolution of individual crises also relevant to national crises?  What additional factors operate in national crises?

  • January 28, 2014 - 4:30pm

    Here is how Professor Haskell describes the talk he’ll give at Yale on January 28th: “I describe the outcome of an unreplicatedunquantified experiment in scientific and literary exploration. I watched one square meter of old growth forest in south-eastern Tennessee for a year, then used my observations to structure the narrative of a book about ecology, evolution, and humanity’s relationships with other parts of the “natural” world. In addition to giving short readings from the book, I discuss some of the challenges and insights that I encountered in my attempt to integrate scientific, literary, and contemplative approaches. In particular, I discuss problems of literary craft (for example, how to write about other species when transparent representation is not possible) and present ideas about how contemplative practice might help biology and ethics to be in fruitful conversation.”

  • October 31, 2013 - 4:00pm
  • October 29, 2013 - 4:00pm

  • October 8, 2013 - 4:00pm

    Co-sponsored with the Poynter Fellowship in Journalism.

  • October 3, 2013 - 1:00pm

  • October 2, 2013 - 1:00pm

  • May 1, 2013 - 4:00pm

    4 pm, Lecture Hall, Peabody Museum
    Lecture by John Cooley, University of Connecticut
    “Marvelous Magicicada
    The World of Our Most Enigmatic Insect”

    5:15 pm, Great Hall, Peabody Museum
    Bug Music, Concert by David Rothenberg, New Jersey Institute of Technology

  • April 22, 2013 - 4:00pm
  • March 30, 2013 - 11:30am

  • March 29, 2013 - 4:00pm
  • March 1, 2013 - 8:00pm to March 2, 2013 - 8:00pm
  • December 14, 2012 - 9:30am
  • December 12, 2012 - 4:30pm
  • November 2, 2012 - 2:00pm

  • November 1, 2012 - 5:00pm

  • January 18, 2012 - 2:30pm